Author Archives: Irwin Feller

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This article is in Infrastructure for a Stormy Future, Winter 2018


What drives innovation? In “What Does Innovation Today Tell Us about the US Economy Tomorrow?” (Issues, Fall 2017), Jeffrey Funk starts with an assertion that puzzles me, but after that he develops and provides evidence for a point of view that is quite consistent with my knowledge. He asserts early on that most scholars of […]

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This article is in Educating the Worker of the Future, Summer 2015


Whither universities? In “A New Model for the American Research University” (Issues, Spring 2015), Michael M. Crow and William B. Dabars argue that public and private research universities are stuck in a pattern of incremental change, when the times call for radical reform. Research universities, long the gold standard of higher education in the United […]

Perspective: It’s about More than Money


This article is in The Path Not Studied, Summer 2008


Presidential Science Advisor John Marburger’s call for a new science of science policy has led the National Science Foundation to initiate a program to support the development of more rigorous empirical and theoretical foundations for understanding and evaluating U.S. science and innovation policies and programs. Reports from the National Academies and many presentations at the […]

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This article is in The Action Begins for the New Administration, Spring 2001


OTA reconsidered While not arguing with the accuracy of Daryl E. Chubin’s view of the positive contributions of the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) (“Filling the Policy Vacuum Created by OTA’s Demise,” Issues, Winter 2000-01), I would point out that the article fails to deal with the fundamental problem that led to OTA’s demise. The […]

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This article is in Preserving Biodiversity, Spring 1999


Strengthening U.S. competitiveness I very much enjoyed reading Debra van Opstal’s “The New Competitive Landscape” (Issues, Winter 1998-99). I and several of my colleagues are actively grappling with the problems of technological competitiveness, because we believe them to be so critical to our nation’s future. The issues are aptly described in van Opstal’s essay. I […]